7 Basic things to know about Infant CPR

Infant CPR – 5 Important things to know

I was in Mumbai a couple of weeks back and got a free pass to the infant CPR workshop. During the workshop, few CPR experts demonstrated a couple of CPR techniques that one should know especially new parents. This is where I realized that it is important for everyone to know basics about CPR.

Based on my research, the American Heart Association says that learning how to perform CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), is one of the first skills new parents should be taught. The AHA says that learning how to perform infant (CPR), is one of the first skills new parents should be taught.

CPR is a life-saving technique that adult patients can use if they become unresponsive or have a cardiac arrest. In this article, you will learn the basic steps to perform CPR. This article is not intended to be a tutorial on infant CPR. Instead, it provides a basic overview of the procedure and the main points you should keep in mind as you plan your infant CPR training.

Disclaimer – This post is not a replacement for completing an authorized and accredited CPR course in your local area. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice and should not be relied on as health or personal advice. Always seek the guidance of your doctor or other qualified health professional with any questions you may have regarding your health or a medical condition.


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What to know before you begin

Knowledge is power, and before you start CPR training, there are a few things you should know. First, infant CPR is not a substitute for pediatric CPR. It’s meant to be a standalone technique used by adults and children of any age. In fact, the AHA recommends that you don’t use infant CPR on a child of less than one year old. Also, the technique is not for everyone. The AHA recommends that you not attempt infant CPR unless you are trained and prepared to perform it properly. If you’re not sure you’re ready, it’s probably best to take the time to get trained properly and in emergency situations you should refer to a doctor.

infant cpr anytime

Steps about how to perform CPR on an infant

  • Get the patient to a stable, upright position and clear their airway
  • If the patient stops breathing, start CPR
  • Keep CPR going until emergency personnel arrive
  • Follow basic rules of first aid, including cleaning and disinfecting the skin and mouth
  • Keep in mind, infants can suffer from hypothermia and Hyperthermia, too
  • Know when to seek medical help

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When to Perform Infant CPR

The American Heart Association recommends that you not attempt infant CPR unless you are trained and prepared to perform it properly. If you’re not sure you’re ready, it’s probably best to take the time to get trained properly.

How long does baby CPR take?

There’s no exact time frame for how long to perform CPR. The best way to know is to keep track of how long you spend on each step of the process. First, you’ll need to get the patient to a stable, upright position and clear their airway. After that, you’ll start CPR, followed by keeping it up until emergency personnel arrive. Again, there’s no exact time frame for how long you should keep going. You should keep track of how long you spend on each step of the process.

Tips for improving your training

There are a few things you can do to improve your baby CPR skills. First, join a local organization that offers infant CPR training. You can find these organizations in your area by contacting your local Red Cross chapter, American Heart Association, or other community health organization. Also, take advantage of every opportunity to train. Find ways to practice your skills, whether that’s during meals, while waiting in the car, or while running errands.

7 Basic things to know about Infant CPR

Conclusion

By now, you should know what to expect and what steps to take when performing CPR. This knowledge will help you save a life if a medical emergency happens. Prenatal education and CPR training are the best ways to prepare yourself and your family for the unexpected. Remember, while it’s easy to feel overwhelmed and unprepared, most people don’t experience a medical emergency until they are older. Keeping these tips in mind, you can be sure your family will be prepared and ready for any emergency.

As mentioned before this post is not a replacement for completing an authorized and accredited CPR course in your local area.

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